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PAA Pro James Watson defines formula for improving your tournament results

Story by Russ Bassdozer

PAA and FLW Tour pro James Watson of Waynesville, Missouri has amped up his approach, his determination to succeed and his confidence in fishing this year – which paid off big for him. Please join us in congratulating James on his first-ever qualification for the FLW Forrest Wood Cup championship after four years competing on the FLW Tour. Watson finished 23rd in the FLW AOY points race and he’s also had a commendable 4th place finish in the 2nd PAA Tournament Series event at Fort Loudon/Tellico Lakes in May. With two more PAA Tournament Series events still to come for 2013, we look for James to finish 2013 strong on the PAA side too.  Read More

 

07.May.2013 by Brett Carlson

James Watson isn’t a household name in professional bass fishing. At this point in his career, he’s OK with that. But if the fourth-year pro from Waynesville, Mo., continues his current track, that will soon change.

Watson, a 10-year Army veteran, is a relative newcomer to the sport. Upon completion of his military service, Watson began employment as a real estate sales agent. After thriving in that role, the 40-year-old…. Read More

James-Watson-Header-Photo

Story by Russ Bassdozer

PAA and FLW Tour pro James Watson of Waynesville, Missouri has amped up his approach, his determination to succeed and his confidence in fishing this year – which paid off big for him. Please join us in congratulating James on his first-ever qualification for the FLW Forrest Wood Cup championship after four years competing on the FLW Tour. Watson finished 23rd in the FLW AOY points race and he’s also had a commendable 4th place finish in the 2nd PAA Tournament Series event at Fort Loudon/Tellico Lakes in May. With two more PAA Tournament Series events still to come for 2013, we look for James to finish 2013 strong on the PAA side too.

Why is Watson fishing better this year? Because he’s following a self-made six point plan that he believes can help any angler improve their game.

For years, all we’ve ever really heard are vague things like:

  • Spending time on the water
  • Having instant access to search online tournament location information
  • Having GPS coordinates
  • Making all the right decisions
  • Not losing any fish
  • Having a good practice
  • Not practicing, fishing only the moment
  • Going with your gut

Unfortunately there’s just no way for an angler to use those oft-cited vagaries as a means to improve his or her own results.

Really for the first time, there is something for every angler to learn from how Watson changed to fish stronger this year. Watson’s not reinventing the wheel but he is recombining and restructuring it in a comprehensive, understandable way that has not been explained before, and that any angler can follow to improve their results like Watson improved his. Please enjoy and follow Watson’s six point improvement plan.

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James-Watson FLW-Cupberth

07.May.2013 by Brett Carlson

James Watson isn’t a household name in professional bass fishing. At this point in his career, he’s OK with that. But if the fourth-year pro from Waynesville, Mo., continues his current track, that will soon change.

Watson, a 10-year Army veteran, is a relative newcomer to the sport. Upon completion of his military service, Watson began employment as a real estate sales agent. After thriving in that role, the 40-year-old opened his own Realty Executives franchise in central Missouri right outside Fort Leonard Wood. Once his business took off, Watson took to the water.

“I now spend over 200 days a year fishing,” he said. “Thankfully I have a manager that runs everything, even when I’m there in the office. I don’t have to worry about stuff when I’m gone, and that is so helpful. Could I make more money if I wasn’t always on the road? Sure, but it’s not all about the money, it’s really not. All I want to do now is fish.”

Not one to shy away from a challenge, Watson took his lumps his first few years on Tour. He’d catch a big bag one day only to return to the same area the next and strike out using similar tactics.

“I made a conscious effort this year not to get spun out and get upset at myself,” he explained. “That has allowed me to follow my gut. When you’re following your gut, you’re fishing by the seat of your pants. I’m going to every event now with an open mind and a good attitude. Over the last few years, I put a lot of pressure on myself. I’d have one bad tournament and I’d be so mad I’d put even more pressure on myself to catch them at the next tournament. And the negativity would just snowball.”

Read More over on FLWOutdoors.com